The Early Learning Center

The ELC is a child enrichment program designed to create the love of learning with a partnership between parents and teachers.

Through discovery, growth, nurturing and creativity the children develop their highest potential. 

October 2017

ELC Parent Newsletter October 2017
Happy Fall!
We are enjoying our new school year as the children and teachers are now settling into their classrooms!

Creative Curriculum and TS Gold
Our teachers are in full swing of using the Creative Curriculum and TS Gold in your child’s class. Through observation taken by each of our teachers we are able to look at the developmental progression of the students in each class. The wonderful thing about Creative Curriculum is that through our observations we can connect our teaching in each class to make sure that children are all receiving instruction to where they fall on the developmental bands, and we can really individualize our instruction in classrooms. If you have any questions about what classrooms are doing with your child in their curriculum please ask your child’s teacher! They would love to share!
 

“If you want your children to be intelligent, read them fairy tales. If you want them to be more intelligent, read them more fairy tales.”  ― Albert Einstein

“If you want your children to be intelligent, read them fairy tales. If you want them to be more intelligent, read them more fairy tales.” 
― Albert Einstein

Lost Items-Our teachers do their best to keep track of all the items children come to school with! Label your child's items and please DO NOT bring items that are precious to you or your child.

 

Snow is here. Please bring and label:A hat, mittens, a snow suit or snow jacket and pants, snow boots, and sunscreen for your child. The teachers will be bringing the kids outside everyday that weather allows.

Snow is here. Please bring and label:A hat, mittens, a snow suit or snow jacket and pants, snow boots, and sunscreen for your child. The teachers will be bringing the kids outside everyday that weather allows.

A note from Shirley from Kids First

As parents of young children, it can seem like there is a wealth of information, sometimes contradictory information, and not enough time to connect with your child, let alone read more about early childhood!

I hope you will take just a few minutes however to learn about an important practice in early childhood – continuity of care. Basically, this means that one or both teachers move with the group of children (or no one moves at all) and care for the same group of children for 2 or 3 years. This is not a new concept, in fact there have been different names, but the same general idea for this for at least a couple generations. What is new is the growing body of evidence from neurobiologists, educators, psychologists and even health care professionals that support the idea of fewer transitions for young children that result in stronger relationships between children and their care-givers.Research and practitioners cite these benefits of using a continuity of care model:

    •    Stronger knowledge of individual children – allows for more individualization of care.

    •    Decreased stress for children and families – children are stressed when their environment changes, everyone is stressed by breaking and forming new relationships.

    •    Smoother developmental progress – less starting and stopping and starting over.

    •    Easier transitions when it is necessary, because they already have strong relationships.

    •    Strong family-caregiver partnerships – value for each other’s expertise when making decisions or setting goals.

    •    Parents empowered to be strong advocates for their children – this carries through to formal schooling.

    •    A more family like atmosphere – a sense of closeness or extended family.

    •    Improved behavior of children.

    •    Stronger, more secure attachments.

These are all important, but I would add that the last one – more secure attachments is the benefit that is seen by researchers as the number one key to the child’s future development and ability to be successful in future relationships and learning!

The reality is that: “Human babies are not like us” (Jean-Jacques Rousseau). Their needs, interests, capacity, and preferences are different that those of older children (in grade level classrooms) or adults, and they need to be supported differently. A childcare program needs to ensure that high quality ratios and group sizes, a healthy environment, qualified staff, and strong leadership are in place to ensure the best possible experiences for children as they live, love, and play through their days in an early childhood setting.

For more reading – when you can’t sleep!                

    •    https://developingchild.harvard.edu                 

    •    https://zerotothree.org – search for attachment

    •    https://earlylearningco.org – developmental guidelines

                                                            Shirley Ritter

                                                           Director Kids First

“Attachment is lasting psychological connectedness between human beings.” (Bowbly, 1969, p.194) Early attachment styles are established in infancy through the infant/caregiver relationship, and influence development and behavior throughout the life span.

Art with Young Children

Our very own Samantha Jacobs is leading a workshop for early childhood educators about projects for young children that help foster their creativity and motor skills on November 13th. Parents are welcome, so please call our office for more information!